My dad had offered to drive me to my friend’s wedding. He loved road trips, and I loved his company. He loved to spend money on me, and I loved to not stress about money. (I was a broke college student back then.) It was an ideal arrangement for us both.

There was no GPS, but my dad was a crazy-talented mapper in his day. I handed him the wedding invitation, packed my suitcase, and got in the car. Then somewhere between home and New Jersey… well, you read the first sentence.

When you have a dad who is willing and able to provide for all of your needs AND get you where you need to go, all you have to do is get in the car. Then you’re free to jam out together to ‘60s music and hotly discuss your philosophy professor and that thing he said that you thought was profound but your dad thought was nuts. You’re free to eat too many SunChips and laugh and cry about all the things that are mattering to you both – because when you have a dad like that, you’re going to end up making it to New Jersey on time.

You probably already know the point I’m about to make – that we who have been washed clean in the blood of Christ have a Heavenly Father Who has the resources and ability to get us where we need to go. That means that we don’t have to. That means that most of the time we spend worrying and planning, trying so hard to drum up the wisdom of the ages to somehow slug ourselves another miniscule inch further – most of the time we do that, we could have just been listening to ‘60s music and eating SunChips. More importantly, we could have been listening to His opinions about the philosophies of the day and laughing and crying about all the things that matter together.

We who have been washed clean in the blood of Christ have a Heavenly Father Who has the resources and ability to get us where we need to go. That means that we don’t have to.

This week I saw the gap between where I am and where I need to be to do the task God has put in front of me – and it’s really big, that gap. It made me cry. “The problem isn’t that I don’t understand what I’ve got to be,” I told Him. “I see that pretty clearly. The problem is that I’m not that, and I don’t know how to get there.”

Maybe you relate?

Well, if you do, you should know that when I said that, He first reminded me of all the ways He – not I – got me to where I am now. Then I almost heard Him laughing, and I remembered Who was driving.

So how do we get where we need to go?

I discovered the answer to that long ago, somewhere between home and New Jersey.

 

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